Drug Health Indigenous Models Project

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Drug Health Indigenous Models Project

This project is investigating practising Alcohol and Other Drugs (Drug Health) clinicians’ perspectives of the barriers and facilitators in implementing cultural proficient practices in their workplace.

Australian Aboriginal people score poorly on the majority of health indices. A recognised opportunity for closing the gap is to ensure that health services for Indigenous Australians are provided by culturally proficient clinicians. Since the early 2000’s cultural proficiency training has been formally implemented into health education yet, two decades later, many Indigenous health consumers report experiences of discrimination and feelings of low trust when engaging with health services.

This project is investigating practising Alcohol and Other Drugs (Drug Health) clinicians’ perspectives of the barriers and facilitators in implementing cultural proficient practices in their workplace.

Data collection will be conducted using Nominal Group Technique (NGT) to generate findings from clinicians. The Yerin Dilly Indigenist framework will inform the values of the approach, and findings will be presented in coded themes through a constant comparative method.

A clearer understanding of how clinicians perceive barriers and facilitators to cultural proficiency in their service can identify potential threats and opportunities to inclusive and culturally proficient care.

Translating the results of this project into policy and practices that increase the cultural acceptability of Drug Health services will contribute towards more equitable health care environments for Indigenous Australians by increasing the perception of cultural safety.